Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Mr. Viking » Tue Nov 06, 2012 2:40 pm

amontillado is in between fino and ollorosso, and can be seen as a "failed" fino. Finos are aged under a thick cap of yeast which keeps it from oxidising. Olorosso is fortified to a strength where the cap cannot grow, so age oxiditavely. Amontillado begins with a cap of yeast which dies of for whatever reason, so is in between the two. It has a markedly different character to the others. I think outside of these most sherry is produced for blending to make things such as cream sherry or cooking sherry
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by slipperyyoke » Sun Dec 02, 2012 5:40 pm

Opinions/recommendations for Georgian Wines?
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Mr Boozificator » Mon Dec 03, 2012 1:16 am

slipperyyoke wrote:Opinions/recommendations for Georgian Wines?
Sorry, I have no personal experience with those.
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Wingman » Fri Dec 07, 2012 7:34 pm

slipperyyoke wrote:Opinions/recommendations for Georgian Wines?
certainly: make sure you get something from the northern regions, like around helen. most of the wine vinted here is made from grapes from out of state, but there are some actual vinyards (i spell it like it sounds, honey) up around there.
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by BBoozer » Wed Dec 12, 2012 3:19 am

Wingman wrote:
slipperyyoke wrote:Opinions/recommendations for Georgian Wines?
certainly: make sure you get something from the northern regions, like around helen. most of the wine vinted here is made from grapes from out of state, but there are some actual vinyards (i spell it like it sounds, honey) up around there.
Ahum, Wingman, I don't know how to bring this to you, but I *think* (and I may be wrong) that slipperyyoke is referring to the former Soviet Republic Georgia, which is renowned for its great wines (ask JimLahey, he is from Russian descent, and his parents used to drink Georgian wines).

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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Wingman » Thu Dec 13, 2012 6:49 pm

BBoozer wrote:
Ahum, Wingman, I don't know how to bring this to you, but I *think* (and I may be wrong) that slipperyyoke is referring to the former Soviet Republic Georgia, which is renowned for its great wines (ask JimLahey, he is from Russian descent, and his parents used to drink Georgian wines).
well, they would almost have to be better than ours. how did the other georgia get their name, do you think? and when? i suppose i should google that. but i'll probably forget.
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Mr. Viking » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:19 pm

Wingman wrote:
BBoozer wrote:
Ahum, Wingman, I don't know how to bring this to you, but I *think* (and I may be wrong) that slipperyyoke is referring to the former Soviet Republic Georgia, which is renowned for its great wines (ask JimLahey, he is from Russian descent, and his parents used to drink Georgian wines).
well, they would almost have to be better than ours. how did the other georgia get their name, do you think? and when? i suppose i should google that. but i'll probably forget.
They were historically on a par with bordeaux I believe. Trouble in Europe over the last 150 years or so saw them crippled
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by BBoozer » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:12 am

Wingman wrote:
BBoozer wrote:
Ahum, Wingman, I don't know how to bring this to you, but I *think* (and I may be wrong) that slipperyyoke is referring to the former Soviet Republic Georgia, which is renowned for its great wines (ask JimLahey, he is from Russian descent, and his parents used to drink Georgian wines).
well, they would almost have to be better than ours. how did the other georgia get their name, do you think? and when? i suppose i should google that. but i'll probably forget.
Well, I googled it for you:

"The terms "Georgia" and "Georgian" appeared in Western Europe in numerous early medieval annals. At the time, the name was folk etymologized – for instance, by the French chronicler Jacques de Vitry and the compiler John Mandeville – from Georgians' especial reverence of Saint George.[12][13] Another theory, popularized by the likes of Jean Chardin, semantically linked "Georgia" to Greek and Latin roots, respectively, γεωργός ("tiller of the land") and georgicus ("agricultural"). The supporters of this explanation sometimes referred to classical authors, in particular Pliny and Pomponius Mela, who wrote of "Georgi" tribes, which were named so to distinguish them from their unsettled and pastoral neighbors.[14] According to some scholars, "Georgia" could have been borrowed in the 11th or 12th century from the Syriac gurz-ān or -iyān and Arabic ĵurĵan or ĵurzan, derived from the New Persian gurğ or gurğān."

And 'your' Georgia was named of King George II of England. But this still did not let us taste Georgian wines, I should visit.

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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Wingman » Fri Dec 14, 2012 11:46 pm

BBoozer wrote: Well, I googled it for you:

"The terms "Georgia" and "Georgian" appeared in Western Europe in numerous early medieval annals. At the time, the name was folk etymologized – for instance, by the French chronicler Jacques de Vitry and the compiler John Mandeville – from Georgians' especial reverence of Saint George.[12][13] Another theory, popularized by the likes of Jean Chardin, semantically linked "Georgia" to Greek and Latin roots, respectively, γεωργός ("tiller of the land") and georgicus ("agricultural"). The supporters of this explanation sometimes referred to classical authors, in particular Pliny and Pomponius Mela, who wrote of "Georgi" tribes, which were named so to distinguish them from their unsettled and pastoral neighbors.[14] According to some scholars, "Georgia" could have been borrowed in the 11th or 12th century from the Syriac gurz-ān or -iyān and Arabic ĵurĵan or ĵurzan, derived from the New Persian gurğ or gurğān."

And 'your' Georgia was named of King George II of England. But this still did not let us taste Georgian wines, I should visit.
of course it was! oglethorpe knew how to kiss ass, after all. i knew someone would google it for me, though, oddly, i learned on the facepage earlier tonight that it meant "farmer," or somesuch.
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Re: Boozy's wine thread - the sequel

Post by Mr. Viking » Sun Apr 14, 2013 3:07 pm

BBoozer wrote:I am a bit puzzled by your statement that you can't find a decent white wine below 10£, but are able to enjoy a 5£ fino. In my experience, it is just the opposite. Agreed, as Boozy said in the original wine thread, price is not really an indication of quality in the case of wines, but I had my share of 5€ sherries and, well, to be honest, they all sucked. My favourite for everyday drinking is Tio Pepe, and it comes around 10€ a bottle in Belgium. Delicious fino to be degustated as aperitif with green olives. Be careful with spicy olives though, because the fino is fragile (I refer to Boozy's comments on wines that go well with olives). Now, the universe of sherry is very broad. I was once in Cordoba with my redhead where we dined in a very fine restaurant and they served us a 30-year old Pedro Ximenez sherry as digestif (indeed, sherries serve as aperitif as well as digestif) and we found this sherry ultimately rewarding and satisfying.
I was probably being silly. I don't drink much white wine, especially not decent stuff. Had a few glasses I enjoyed while at home with my parents, but I can't remember the label. Also, Boozi sent me some Brumont Gros Manseng-Sauvignon which I am enjoying. I found it a bit dry and flinty at first, but it always takes me a while to make my mind up and I now find it quite delicious. Tio Pepe is £10 a bottle here. Most supermarket own brand sherries are quite good in the UK, as Sherry, Sack and Malmsey have been drunk here for so long, so I imagine economies of scale come in. I have never tried expensive sherry and probably should have before drawing conclusions
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